Disaster Relief Training for 2015

Associational disaster relief training is coming up on September 18 and 19 in the Family Life Center at Red Bank Baptist Church.  Those interested can pre-register by calling the HCBA (front desk) at 423-267-3794 or by e-mailing Doyle Pittman at .  Please provide church name, number attending, classes they plan to attend and number for lunch.  An agenda and additional training information follows.

Tennessee Disaster Relief Training Facts:

  • All volunteers must be 18 years old to serve.
  • All volunteers must be a member of a cooperating Tennessee Southern Baptist church.
  • We ask that you please take specialized classroom training after you have taken the prerequisite course of “Introduction to Southern Baptist Disaster Relief.”
  • Disaster Relief credentials and the yellow hat/visor will be given after “Introduction to Southern Baptist Disaster Relief” and specialized classes have been taken.


Disaster Relief Training Costs:

Because of new directives from Homeland Security, FEMA and other national agencies related to the training and screening of volunteer disaster relief workers, we have begun a cost recovery plan. The cost of a new 3 year (ID badge) credential is $36.00 (for newly trained volunteers or those that had credentials that expire in 2015). The new badge will expire in three years (2018), effective January 1, 2015.

This fee will cover not only the cost of the ID and background check but also the cost of any of the basic training courses a volunteer wants to take (except for First Aid classes and other specialized classes such as ServSafe.



How to Prevent Getting Poison Ivy or Poison Oak, & how to treat it if you didn't ...

Our chain-saw cleanup crews constantly come in contact with Poison Oak, usually as vines growing around fallen trees. Some had as much poison oak leaves as tree leaves!! Until now I was in the 15% category of people who do not have an allergic reaction to urushiol, the toxic oil or resin found in poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. I have now joined the majority...!

I got careless and overwhelmed my immune system, I guess. Did not have the right type gloves or long sleeve shirts necessary to keep the urushiol off my skin, and/or protect my skin on my arms and face from scratches and scrapes. When you are pulling and pruning limbs and brush you are often gonna scratch or scrape exposed skin. I was wearing carpenter gloves of leather, with no cuffs and a long sleeve shirt with missing buttons on the sleeves. It left my wrists and forearms unprotected. The gloves protected my hands, but retained the urushiol on the outside. Automatically wiping sweat and wood chips off my face without thinking spread it to one of my eyes, one ear, and on my neck. If your clothes (including gloves) have been contaminated, launder them thoroughly.

Learn from my mistakes. Click on the following link:

and take its contents seriously. If you don't, click on the link below:

you'll need it!

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (cause there ain't no cure!!).

Bob N.


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